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This site is dedicated to the work of hypnotherapist Joe Keeton. Joe helped thousands of people to deal with physical and emotional problems through hypnosis, and he also pioneered the exploration of past-life regression through hypnosis. You can find out about his life and work on the different pages of this site.

The site has been set up, with the approval and support of Joe’s widow Monica, by Simon Petherick, co-author of Joe’s book The Power of the Mind which we have just released as an e-book.

The purpose of the site is to renew interest in the work of this extraordinary man and to gather memories, comments and reflections on his life and achievements. Having reissued his seminal The Power of the Mind, we now hope to republish more of Joe’s books and also books by people who were influenced by him. We welcome suggestions on this. We would also welcome information on hypnotherapists working today.

If you would like to Comment on any part of the site, we would welcome your thoughts – you’ll find a Comment button on most pages. Your first Comment will await moderation – all subsequent Comments you make will go live straight away. This is just a precaution to try and keep the site free from spam. If you would like to write any kind of recollection of Joe and his work, then please email your recollection to Simon using the address shown on the Contact page and it will be uploaded very quickly. Do please also email Simon other ideas and suggestions for the site – in particular, we’d be keen to hear from people who feel they are working in the spirit of Joe’s work today.

Thank you for visiting.

6 thoughts on “Home”

  1. Just to let you know that Monica Keeton’s book ‘I died on the Titanic’ is now available on Amazon and through the website http://www.liverpoolbooksonline.co.uk I am Sue Westoby at Pharaoh Press, Monica’s publisher and it is thanks to Joe Keeton that Monica was able to go through the regression process and conquer her fear of deep water and discover just why she had this fear. The book is fascinating and is dedicated to Joe himself.

  2. So glad to see this website. Joe deely touched many peoples’ lives for the better, including my own. He had a brilliant mind and the world is the poorer for his passing, but he did leave us an insight into that mind through his books.

  3. Hello, I didn’t know Joe but I found his book The Power of the Mind completely fascinating. I am very pleased to see this new website for him.

  4. Arthur O'Hara (stepson) said:

    I have fond memories of Joe’s regression sessions at our house in Hoylake in the mid 1970s. At the time I was something of an ambivalent teenager mostly wrapped up in my own world, but I was often roped in as the tea runner, providing hot drinks and biscuits for anything up to 20 people at a time, wandering in and out of sessions the like of which I’ve never seen before or since. It all seemed pretty ordinary back then, just Joe doing his thing, perhaps it’s only in hindsight that we’ve all come to realise how just special it really was.

  5. Valerie Williams said:

    My brother Stephen and his then wife Tanya set up a group their house in Wimbledon after reading Joe Keeton wanted to visit small numbers of interested people in their homes . . . . . Joe visited our group for some time and with some amazing results . . . the only person he could not hypnotise sadly was me . . . . but I remember looking forward to his visits and would love to hear from anyone who was in our group at that time . . it was sometime in the 1970′s . . . I would also like to know of any reputable past life regressionists in or around the London area.
    Valerie

  6. Congratulations on the creation of the site (also: a belated R.I.P. to Joe Keeton; I’ve only just learned of his sad passing via the site).

    Years ago – decades! – I caught by chance a feature about regression put out one evening by a local radio station (BRMB, serving the West Midlands). On it, a volunteer was taken back to two characters: a laconic, yokel-ish farmhand, and a sickly young woman apparently lying on her deathbed. It was an absolutely unexpected, out-of-left-field thing to hear being broadcast by a radio station, midweek, early evening! (I doubt today any radio station would have either the time or the inclination to devote an hour or two so to such a perplexing subject). I’ve never forgotten an episode being somewhat reluctantly ‘relived’ by the volunteer on air, as the farmhand met up with a local woman behind his wife’s back, or the account of the sickly lady’s dreary, curtailed existence, as she lay bedridden and close to death. The regressionist, very calm of voice and manner, and with a light northern accent, can only have been Joe Keeton.

    It would be fascinating (for nostalgia’s sake, if nothing else) to hear a recording of that show again, although I doubt one exists (the farmhand’s ‘name’ was Jack, and the poorly lady’s Mary, I can remember to this day!). But it makes me wonder about recordings that do exist. Presumably audio recordings would’ve been made almost as standard practice by or for Joe. Above and beyond the short extract available on the ‘Media’ page, have many/any of these survived? It would be a shame if most of this ‘field material’ had just been wiped (as for example, early episodes of now cherished BBC sitcoms were routinely wiped in the ’60s, for reasons of economy and storage). I hope that any other recordings that have survived can be given the appropriate preservation treatment, and at some point digitally converted, so that eventually the ‘Media’ section can build to become an online repository of sorts. As someone positioned on the sceptical side of the fence, I have to say that this is the sort of thing that has to be heard to be credited. Recordings of the process of regression possess an immediacy and power that written accounts are obviously going to lack. Any other surviving recordings of regressions conducted by Joe that can be matched up to submitted written recollections would no doubt help to flesh out the latter a lot.

    Best wishes for the website, and to all those involved in keeping the memory of Joe and his work alive.

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